Getting to know the Clydesdales




Today we’ll talk about Clydesdale horses. Do you know what they look like? They’re really tall and hefty fellows (and girls). They’re the horses you see pulling wagons in Budweiser beer commercials. They are also usually featured during the superbowl football games.

Do you know how horses are measured? They’re height is determined by how many “hands” high they are. Each hand is four inches. If you have a Clydesdale horse who measures 18.2 hands that would be 74 inches.  
Clydesdales are sometimes called “Draft Horses” because they’re very good at pulling heavy loads. They can haul things or pull wagons and it’s no trouble at all for them.
What colors are they? Clydesdales are usually brown, or a reddish color, called chestnut. But some of them want to be different. They have Sabino or spotted patterns on their tummies. They’re called “Strawberry Roans” if they are chestnut or bay (brown) colored. What are they called if they’re black with the spotted tummies? Did you guess Blue Roans? That would be correct if you did.
When you were a baby, your mom was thrilled if you drank a few ounces of milk at a time. What about Mama Clydesdale? Her little bundle of joy weighs a whopping eighty pounds when he’s born. He needs about seven gallons of milk a day to keep him growing!
One more fun thing about Clydesdales. Did you know they have feathers? Not all over their bodies like birds, but around their hooves (feet) they have long hair. It makes them look like their dressed in flared pants. In the picture below be sure to notice the feathers around the horse’s lower legs. Do you like them? I think they are special and unique.

when I was growing up at our riding school, Sweetbrier, the Clydesdale horses often stayed with us while they were in town for a festival. It was fun to see them in person and many people came by to visit them. Each horse had a personal groom, or someone to care for them.

Clydesdale Horse.
from Shutterstock.com.

By OlesyaNickolaeva
*some content from the internet
copyright Deanie Humphrys-Dunne 2019

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